What is Demand?

What is Demand?

What is Demand? Jonathan Poland

Demand refers to the quantity of a particular good, asset, or other value that market participants are willing and able to purchase at a given price level over a specific time period. It represents the desire and ability of consumers or investors to acquire a product or asset, and it is typically influenced by a variety of factors, such as the price of the item, the income of the potential buyers, the perceived value or utility of the item, and the availability of substitutes. The relationship between demand and price is often depicted in a demand curve, which shows how the quantity of a good or asset that consumers are willing to buy changes as the price changes.

Law of Demand

The law of demand is a fundamental principle of economics that states that, in general, there is an inverse relationship between the price of a good or service and the quantity of it that people are willing to buy. This means that as the price of a good or service increases, the quantity of it that consumers are willing to purchase tends to decrease, and as the price decreases, the quantity that consumers are willing to purchase tends to increase. This relationship is often depicted graphically in a demand curve, which shows the relationship between price and quantity demanded. The law of demand is an important concept in economics because it helps to explain and predict how changes in price can affect the quantity of a good or service that consumers are willing to buy.

Equilibrium

The demand curve is a graphical representation of the relationship between the price of a good or service and the quantity of it that consumers are willing and able to purchase at that price. It is typically plotted on a graph with the price on the y-axis and the quantity on the x-axis. The demand curve slopes downward, showing that as the price of a good or service increases, the quantity demanded decreases, and as the price decreases, the quantity demanded increases.

The supply curve is another graphical representation that shows the relationship between the price of a good or service and the quantity of it that producers are willing and able to offer for sale at that price. Like the demand curve, the supply curve is plotted on a graph with the price on the y-axis and the quantity on the x-axis. The supply curve slopes upward, indicating that as the price of a good or service increases, the quantity supplied increases, and as the price decreases, the quantity supplied decreases.

The intersection of the demand curve and the supply curve is known as the market equilibrium. At this point, the quantity of the good or service that consumers are willing to buy is equal to the quantity that producers are willing to sell, and the price of the good or service is determined by the intersection of the two curves. If the price falls below the equilibrium price, there will be excess demand, or a shortage, and the price will tend to rise. If the price rises above the equilibrium price, there will be excess supply, or a surplus, and the price will tend to fall. In an efficient market, prices and quantities are in equilibrium. As such, supply and demand curves can be used to model a wide range of economic conditions and theories.

Elasticity

The price elasticity of demand measures the percentage change in the demand for a good or service in response to a one percent change in price. This elasticity is almost always negative, meaning that demand decreases as price increases. When the elasticity is less than 1, demand is considered inelastic. This means that a small change in price will not significantly affect the quantity of the good or service demanded. On the other hand, when the elasticity is greater than 1, demand is considered elastic. In this case, a small change in price will lead to a significant change in the quantity of the good or service demanded. For firms, optimal revenue is achieved at a price where the elasticity is exactly 1. At this point, a price increase will not significantly affect demand and therefore will not reduce revenue. However, if the elasticity is greater than 1, price increases will result in a decrease in demand and therefore a decrease in revenue.

Learn More
Adoption Rate Jonathan Poland

Adoption Rate

Adoption rate refers to the speed at which users begin to utilize a new product, service, or feature. It is…

Dynamic Pricing Jonathan Poland

Dynamic Pricing

Dynamic pricing refers to the practice of changing prices in real time in response to changes in market conditions or…

Tactical Planning Jonathan Poland

Tactical Planning

Tactical planning is the process of developing specific strategies and actions to achieve the objectives of an organization. It involves…

Knowledge Value Jonathan Poland

Knowledge Value

Knowledge value is the value that is derived from knowledge, skills, and information. It can be a measure of the…

Brand Risk Jonathan Poland

Brand Risk

Brand risk refers to the potential for a brand to lose value or for a new brand to fail in…

Exit Planning 150 150 Jonathan Poland

Exit Planning

Exit planning is a comprehensive strategy for business owners to transition out of their company on their terms. It involves…

Tactical Risk Jonathan Poland

Tactical Risk

Tactical risk refers to the potential for losses due to changes in business conditions in real-time. Tactics differ from strategy…

Pre-Sales Jonathan Poland

Pre-Sales

The term “pre-sales” can refer to a range of different things depending on the industry in which it is used.…

Cost Variance Jonathan Poland

Cost Variance

Cost variance (CV) is a project management metric that measures the difference between the budgeted cost of a project and…

Content Database

Search over 1,000 posts on topics across
business, finance, and capital markets.

Storytelling Jonathan Poland

Storytelling

Storytelling is the act of using narrative to communicate information in an engaging and memorable way. Businesses can use storytelling…

Companies Likely to Aquire Federal Funding 150 150 Jonathan Poland

Companies Likely to Aquire Federal Funding

While the specific industries receiving federal funding can vary depending on the country and its government priorities, there are several…

Strategic Planning Techniques Jonathan Poland

Strategic Planning Techniques

Strategic planning is the process of defining an organization’s direction and making decisions on allocating its resources to pursue this…

Decision Automation Jonathan Poland

Decision Automation

Decision automation refers to the use of technology to automate the process of making decisions. This can be done through…

Market Forces Jonathan Poland

Market Forces

The interaction that shapes a market economy. Market forces are the factors that determine the supply and demand for a…

Product Features Jonathan Poland

Product Features

A product feature is a characteristic or aspect of a product that contributes to its overall functionality and performance. Product…

Operational Efficiency Jonathan Poland

Operational Efficiency

Operational efficiency can be defined as the ratio between the inputs to run a business and the output gained from the business. It is primarily a metric that measures the efficiency of profit earned as a function of operating costs.

What is a Tagline? Jonathan Poland

What is a Tagline?

A tagline is a short, catchy phrase that is used to summarize the core message or value proposition of a…

Procurement Risk Jonathan Poland

Procurement Risk

Procurement risk is the risk of financial loss or other negative consequences that may arise from the process of procuring…